Cheese Allergies


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cheese-allergy

Anyone have a cheese allergy – is there such a thing?

I quit cheese about 2 weeks ago and MAN do I feel better.  I was exhausted all the time – now not so much anymore.

Actually – I had no digestive indications – just felt exhausted all the time.  Is this common? Is there data on this?

Best Answer – Chosen by Voters

You most likely have an  dairy allergy or are lactose intolerant than allergic to the cheese itself.  Depending on the type of cheese you eat determines how much milk it contains.  For example; low fat would of course have less milk than high fat or highly processed cheeses. However, certain cheeses are also known to can contain histamines which can mimic an allergy.  The making of cheese is closely related to how mold grows and some people which have mold allergies may also react to certain cheeses.  It is always wise to seek out allergy testing to see what other dairy related foods might be bothering you.

Related Posts: Dairy Allergies, Milk Allergies and Food Allergies.

Source: Yahoo Answers

Cheese Allergy

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Tomato Allergy


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tomato-allergyTomato allergies are not as common as other food allergies. Tomatoes are a part of the “nightshade” allergy family. However, those that do have a severe tomato allergy face the  possibility of anaphylactic shock and death.

Allergy or Intolerance

More persons actually have a food intolerance for tomatoes and not a full-blown tomato allergy.  An intolerance for tomatoes usually creates gastrointestinal problems, such as diarrhea, cramps or vomiting.  A protein found in tomatoes is generally what creates the allergic reaction by the body’s immune system. A persons immune protection function see the tomato protein as a toxin and attempts to eliminate it by releasing histamines to kill it.  It is the histamines themselves which create swelling, hives, rashes, headaches, and other symptoms which may even include the constriction of the bronchial tubes. In very severe cases; too many histamines can cause respiratory distress, failure, and even death during an anaphylactic shock.  A tomato allergy can occur in 15-20 minutes and can subside just as quickly if the correct medication is administered.

Many people who have a known tomato allergy can actually tolerate well cooked tomatoes with little or no reaction. Other people report that they can consume low acid tomatoes. However, data shows that all tomatoes are equally acidic and what they are really referring to is the flavanoids that give the taste of acidity.

Note that in both of these cases, a food journal should be kept for a month or more (noting symptoms after meals) to share with the physician if you suspect you may have a tomato allergy. An allergy test done by a qualified allergy doctor is the only accurate way to determine if you truly have a tomato related allergy. Food allergy tests may include various blood tests, skin tests, possible nasal smears, and a full food journal review. They should also consider whether or not your parents have had food allergies.

Here are a few tips for tomato allergy sufferers:

  • There are tomato-free sauces, ketchup, barbecue, and salsa available at certain retailers but are better found by researching online.
  • Take supplements which are known to help allergies. These would include beta carotene,vitamin C, vitamin E, pantothenic acid, glucosamine, and quercitin which is a well known flavonoid. Flavanoids are powerful antioxidants which can reduce inflammation and block the release of histamines.
  • Try making a no tomato ‘pasta sauce’ by adding a lot of olive oil  and add lots of veggies chopped up and spices which can make a great sauce!
  • If ordering out, try a white or pesto base instead of a tomato base. Also, specify no catsup anytime when ordering out.
  • Eat vegetables high in digestive enzymes to assist in the proper digestion. Some food-based enzymes include onions and garlic.

Related Posts:  Food Allergies, Citrus Allergies and Strawberry Allergies.

About the author: Jimmy Don Strongwell operates a organic farm which are known for their great tomatoes and other vegetables in the Canton area of East Texas.

Ferrari eats a tomato

Sinus Pain


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sinus-painYour sinuses are lined with a membrane that manufactures a sticky substance known as mucus. When the membrane swells – most likely because of an infection or an allergy, mucus production kicks into overdrive. The combination of inflamed membrane and excess mucous blocks those tiny passages between your sinuses and nose. That’s when you feel the pressure build behind your forehead and eyes.

Breathe a Sign of Relief

For most people decongestants are the treatment of choice for sinus pain. “If a blocked nose is your only symptom, an over-the-counter oral decongestant can help,” says Salah D. Salmon, MD, director of the Sinus Center at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston.  Dr. Salmon also stated “Be sure to choose a product with an antihistamine if your sinus pain is associated with allergy.”

What about localized decongestants such as sprays and drops? “They can be extremely effective, too.” Dr. Salmon says. “But you shouldn’t use them for more than three days in a row. They can be habit forming if you use them for too long. And once their medicinal effects wear off, they can produce rebound congestion.”

But decongestants are not your only option for dealing with sinus pain. The following strategies can help ease the pressure and keep you breathing easy.

Just add water. “Dryness often sets the stage for a sinus infection,” Dr. Salmon says. You can keep your sinuses moist by drinking plenty of water every day. A saltwater solution, administered as either a nasal spray or nose drops, can also help, he notes. You can make your own solution by mixing 2 tablespoons of salt into a glass filled with 8 ounces of warm water. Use this preparation three to four times a day.

Hold your head high. Elevating your head while you sleep promotes sinus drainage, experts say. Prop up your bedposts ath the head of your bed on books or bricks and see if it helps.

Clear the air. Anything that irritates the nasal passages is an ally of sinus pain. “Pay close attention to air quality,” says Dr. Guillermo Mendoza, MD, chief of allergy for Kaiser-Permanente. “Avoid smoggy environments, cigarette smoke and any other pollutants that you’re sensitive to.” You may also need to stay away from seemingly harmless items such as scented laundry detergents and scented tissues.

“C” your way clear. Dr. Mendoza recommends a daily dose of vitamin C as a preventative against sinus pain. “If you are prone to sinus infection or you have a chronic sinus problem, take 1,000 milligrams of times-release vitamin C a day,” he advises.

Don’t catch a cold. If you have a chronic sinus problem, a cold will only intensify your sinus symptoms, Dr. Mendoza says. So do what you can to steer clear of cold-causing viruses: Eat a balanced diet, get regular exercise, practice good hygiene (as in lots of hand washing), and stay away from people who have colds.

Excerpted from: Pain Remedies by Philip Goldberg.  Rodale Press

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Black Mold Allergies


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Stachybotrys-cultureWhat is Black Mold?

While all molds can appear black, it is normally the dreaded Stachybotrys chartarum (also known by its synonym Stachybotrys atra) to which the term “black mold” is referring to. One primary reason is the fact that Stachybotrys can appear as extremely dark black and shiny when compared to other molds growing on the same surface.

Black Mold Grows Everywhere

It can grow on material with a high cellulose and low nitrogen content, such as fiberboard, gypsum board, paper, dust, and lint. Growth occurs when there is moisture from water damage, excessive humidity, water leaks, condensation, water infiltration or flooding. Stachybotrys is a slow growing mold and needs constant moisture source for its continued colonization.

Black Mold is Toxic

Stachybotrys is considered a toxigenic mold and may produce several toxic chemicals called mycotoxins. Mycotoxins can be present in spores and small mold fragments once released into the air. It is these mycotoxins which can cause what many have referred to as “black mold poisoning”. Black mold or Stachybotrys have received much attention in recent years mostly due to some high profile legal cases in the U.S. and around the world.

Symptoms of Black Mold Exposure

Symptoms of exposure to mycotoxins from Stachybotrys and other toxigenic molds include coughing, wheezing, runny nose, irritated eyes or throat, skin rash and diarrhea. Since these symptoms are general in nature, they also can be caused by a cold, influenza or exposure to other allergens. It is not known what level of mycotoxins from Stachybotrys must be present in the air to cause these symptoms and is believed to vary according to environmental conditions.
Is Black Mold really Different?

While Stachybotrys can occur as an indoor air pollutant, it is actually found much less than other toxigenic molds. However, it is paramount to test for mold when there has been events which could promote any toxic mold in the indoor environment. If any toxigenic mold is found in the indoor environment, extra steps to eliminate the live (viable) and dead (non-viable) mold spores must be taken. It is important to understand that live or dead spores in sufficient quantities can cause serious respiratory illnesses in certain humans depending on many factors.

About the author:

The Sick House Center is a resource and information about indoor air pollution to include mold related issues. View Mold Pictures at the Sick House Center.

Black Mold Exposure Film Trailer