Vaccination Allergies


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allergy-vaccinesAllergy shots, also known as allergy vaccines have an interesting history. The idea behind a vaccination is this: That which doesn’t kill you will make you stronger. No doubt, all these developments in vaccinations around the turn of the century gave rise to allergists experimenting with the same principles in an attempt to treat allergies. This is based on the notion that inoculations small but increasing doses of the offending allergens will eventually induce a tolerance to the allergen.

However, “allergy shots” that a conventional allergist administers represents a rather crude approach that is rarely effective. A recent study reported in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine shows that shots are of no significant benefit as compared with a placebo when it comes to treating children with asthma.

Why Are Allergy Shots Still Used?

Consider treatments for a diagnosis of food sensitivity, relief can usually be observed by the mere avoidance of the offending foods. One can readily see the economic advantage for the allergist to continue to give and charge for weekly shots rather than give dietary advice just once. The true answer may lie more within economics than within science.

In fact, it is believed that as high as 28% of allergy shot patients actually have an allergic response to the vaccine itself thus creating an acute allergic response. In fewer cases, patients have reported that they would consider their allergic response from a single allergy shot to be “serious”. The fact that many allergists know that a serious reaction may be possible have caused them to reduce the allergens placed in the vaccine itself and thus reducing it’s effectiveness.

Many allergy patients and some allergists have stopped using allergy shots for allergy reactions due to both their ineffectiveness and the danger of a serious reaction. Many of these same individuals are reporting better results from avoiding the allergens themselves combined with methods of boosting the immune response of allergy sufferers with known food supplementation.

About the author: Stan K. Hall a.k.a. The Sick House Doctor is a recognized specialist in Indoor Air Pollution as well as Health & Safety in the home. He has performed over 400 indoor environmental evaluations over the past 26 years and has helped hundreds of homeowners make their homes a haven. He is widely known as the originator of T.E.A.M., the scientifically proven approach to controlling and resolving indoor air pollution.

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Allergy Tips


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allergy-tipsAllergies may be more prevalent than we really know. A lot of symptoms attributed to other causes are, in fact, allergic responses. Chronic allergies to foods, food additives or everyday chemical products can produce symptoms that are labeled as colitis, migraine headaches, sinus problems, asthma and a variety of other health problems. Some allergies are disguised as addictions. You may actually crave a food or a substance that causes an unhealthy response, ranging from mood swings to headaches. Common food allergies include milk, wheat, corn,chocolate, peanuts and soft drinks.

There are some tips to consider for alleviating your allergies:

  • A food log can help you pinpoint possible suspect foods. If you write down the menu for every meal, you may be able to identify foods or dishes that are followed by allergic reactions. When you identify a food that may be responsible, try eliminating it for a week to two weeks. If there are no symptoms, reintroduce it to see if symptoms reappear.
  • If you catch colds frequently, your problem may actually stem from an allergy. The runny nose and swollen membranes associated with such allergic responses may be caused by histamines (naturally occurring body chemicals). Vitamin C is a natural antihistamine and can often relieve these symptoms. Sinus-related allergies and hay fever are other problems that can be treated with Vitamin C.
  • If you often have rashes or other skin problems, they may be allergic responses to cosmetics, soaps or even laundry detergent.

Here’s another little-known method of identifying the source of an allergen without the expense of seeing a doctor; Use an unexposed area of your skin, such as your back (you may need assistance from someone). Make sure your skin is clean and dry. Apply a small amount of a suspected allergy-causing substance to your skin and cover with a square of surgical gauze, followed by a bandage or surgical tape. If the test substance is dry, such as a face powder or solid makeup, put a tiny amount of it in mineral oil and apply that to your skin. Keep the test patch on your skin for 24 to 48 hours and watch for an allergic reaction to develop. Once you find out which substance or substances are setting off your allergic response, you’ll know what to avoid.

To learn more about how to make your home a allergy-free haven, please sign up for our sponsor’s Free 10-Part Email Mini-Course on this page or click here to read more.

Understanding Allergies

Exercise Asthma Prevention


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Exercise-induced-Asthma“Exercise asthma” or as it is more commonly called “exercised induced asthma” can trigger an attack in 80 to 90 percent of people with asthma.  In fact, even amateur and professional athletes have particularly high rates of exercised-induced asthma, with studies finding that between 11 and 50 percent are affected.

However make no mistake: exercise-induced asthma, also called exercise induced bronchospasm, is asthma. It’s not a type of asthma, an “asthma-like” condition or a separate disease. It is almost always diagnosed shortly after a person has had an asthma attack or spasm of the bronchial airways, usually with the symptoms starting 5 to 15 minutes after beginning or ending physical exertion. The main cause isn’t really known, but researchers suspect it’s related to the loss of heat, water or both from the lungs during exercise. This occurs because of the common tendency to breath through the mouth when exercising, so cooler air is taken in verses warmer air which passes through the nose (which warms and moistens it).

Some asthmatics may go months before learning they may have exercise-induced asthma. This is because the breathlessness and wheezing they experience after exercising may be the only symptoms of their exercise-induced asthma leading them think that they may only get out of breath easily. That could be why one study found unrecognized exercise-induced asthma in as many as 29 percent of athletes studied.

Exercise-Induced Asthma Prevention Tips

As with any form of asthma, medication plays a major role in controlling the symptoms, but there are several non-medical tips you can use to possibly avoid exercise-induced asthma:

  • Improve your overall physical condition. The better shape you’re in, the stronger your lungs are. Thus, they’ll be less sensitive to the cool, dry air you may take in while exercising.
  • Warm up for at least 10 minutes before you start exercising.
  • Try not to exercise outside in cold weather. If you must (as with skiing), cover your mouth and nose with a scarf or face mask to help warm and moisten the air. Exercise in warm, humidified environments. Swimming in a heated indoor pool is actually considered a good exercise for persons with exercise-induced asthma.
  • Try not to exercise outside in areas of high pollution or at times when the air quality is poor.
  • Wait at least 2 hours after eating before exercising. This ensures that your stomach has emptied and reduces the risk of gastric reflux or heartburn.
  • Try to breath through your nose, not your mouth when possible.

Make sure you always have an EpiPen with you and you know how to administer it to yourself during an emergency attack.

Go to Exercise Asthma for more information about Exercise-Induced Asthma.

Related posts: Avoiding Asthma Attacks.

About the author: Stan K. Hall a.k.a. The Sick House Doctor is a recognized specialist in Indoor Air Pollution as well as Health & Safety in the home. He has performed over 400 indoor environmental evaluations over the past 26 years and has helped hundreds of homeowners make their homes a haven. He is widely known as the originator of T.E.A.M., the scientifically proven approach to controlling and resolving indoor air pollution.

Exercise Induced Asthma

Exercise Asthma


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Exercise-induced-Asthma

“Exercise asthma” or as it is more commonly called “exercised induced asthma” can trigger an attack in 80 to 90 percent of people with asthma.  In fact, even amateur and professional athletes have particularly high rates of exercised-induced asthma, with studies finding that between 11 and 50 percent are affected.

However make no mistake: exercise-induced asthma, also called exercise induced bronchospasm, is asthma. It’s not a type of asthma, an “asthma-like” condition or a separate disease. It is almost always diagnosed shortly after a person has had an asthma attack or spasm of the bronchial airways, usually with the symptoms starting 5 to 15 minutes after beginning or ending physical exertion. The main cause isn’t really known, but researchers suspect it’s related to the loss of heat, water or both from the lungs during exercise. This occurs because of the common tendency to breath through the mouth when exercising, so cooler air is taken in verses warmer air which passes through the nose (which warms and moistens it).

Some asthmatics may go months before learning they may have exercise-induced asthma. This is because the breathlessness and wheezing they experience after exercising may be the only symptoms of their exercise-induced asthma leading them think that they may only get out of breath easily. That could be why one study found unrecognized exercise-induced asthma in as many as 29 percent of athletes studied.

Exercise Asthma Warning Signs

When you exercise, watch out for shortness of breath or wheezing, decreased exercise endurance, chest pain or tightness, upset stomach or a sore throat. If you experience any of these symptoms, stop exercising immediately and allow your breathing and heart-rate to return to normal. Usually the “attack” should only last only a few minutes, but it can be as scary as any other asthma attack, often leading otherwise healthy people to avoid exercise altogether.

The only way to know for sure if your symptoms are related to asthma is to see an asthma and allergy specialist, who should conduct an “exercise challenge” test to confirm a diagnosis. This test usually involves evaluating your lung function before and after you’ve run on a treadmill or exercise bicycle.

Go to Exercise Asthma Prevention for related prevention tips.

Related posts: Asthma and Allergies.

About the author: Stan K. Hall a.k.a. The Sick House Doctor is a recognized specialist in Indoor Air Pollution as well as Health & Safety in the home. He has performed over 400 indoor environmental evaluations over the past 26 years and has helped hundreds of homeowners make their homes a haven. He is widely known as the originator of T.E.A.M., the scientifically proven approach to controlling and resolving indoor air pollution.

Exercise induced asthma

Fire Ant Allergy


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fire-ant-allergyFire ants were originally introduced to the United States from South America during the 1920s, fire ants are now well established in several southern states. The venom of the fire ants differs from that of small biting insects, in that it can produce several local allergic reactions or systemic anaphylactic reactions.

The fire ants attack by biting to secure itself, then inserts its stinging apparatus, which contains the venom. Highly sensitive individuals with high levels of allergic antibodies against the venom of the fire ant are usually treated with immunotherapy.

Someone who is sensitive to insect bites should avoid:

  • Standing in the direct path of fire ant mounds and their traffic zones
  • Contact with a nest
  • Throwing objects or disturbing a nest
  • Hitting a mound when mowing
  • Planting flowers in a fire ant zone
  • Trimming hedges or shrubs in a fire ant zone
  • Walking barefoot outdoors
  • Cooking or eating outdoors

Fire Ant Control Tips

There are many safe fire ants mound control products available today which will help in controlling the fire ant population in your yard. However, they usually require more than one application per season. Always make sure you keep your pets away from fire ant zones as they can also have severe fire ant reactions when bitten. If you have a fire ant problem in your yard then it is advisable that you walk your perimeter weekly to help spot new mounds and zones so you can treat them promptly.

About the author: About the author: Stan K. Hall a.k.a. The Sick House Doctor is a recognized specialist in Indoor Air Pollution as well as Health & Safety in the home. He has performed over 400 indoor environmental evaluations over the past 26 years and has helped hundreds of homeowners make their homes a haven. He is widely known as the originator of T.E.A.M., the scientifically proven approach to controlling and resolving indoor air pollution.

HOW TO KILL FIRE ANTS ~ DEAD !